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The Foundation for Success in US Offshore Wind...Planning

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Trade Point Atlantic - Roll On SEA.O.G Offshore Solves the Need for Industry Know-how  in a New Market In June of this year SGRE CEO Andreas Nauen when interviewed by the Business Network for Offshore Wind was asked a straightforward question: What are the main criteria for factory locations in the USA for offshore wind?  His response included uncomplicated, reliable, and economical transport of components between port facilities. For the success of the industry, the transportation linkages between the posse of likely port contenders on the East Coast is crucial to understand.   One step further, the linkages to the offshore wind parks are equally as important to understand.   The market needs to have a full view and understanding of how to transport this specialized equipment safely and efficiently.   The key to understanding this potentially complex web of ports, projects, cargo and cabotage is planning . Trade Point Atlantic - Roll On At SEA.O.G Offshore we are able to bring loc

SEA.O.G Successfully Completes 300mw Transportation Service Contract with Engineered Short Sea Solutions.

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      SEA.O.G recently closed the book on a 300mw wind farm transportation project in Eastern Canada.  The project required the transportation of over 1000 components.  With the help of  SEA.O.G's transportation planners and local field professionals on site these heavy components moved through port facilities  and local factories via, rail, heavy lift ships, trucks and barges, all the while being monitored by TrakReport .  The scope of work included maritime operations pre-planning and stowage verification of planned heavy lift vessel operations, cargo condition surveys and inventory at marine terminals / factories, rail loading supervision,  rail car modification,  truck loading supervision, Marine Warranty surveys, and marine terminal / longshoring health and safety consultation. Short Sea - the future of routing for wind turbine transportation in North America. SEA.O.G has been on the forefront of unique maritime solutions for the wind turbine transportation industry

Marine Coordination Centers: Bridging Safety Gaps in the US Offshore Wind Industry

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The US offshore wind industry is on the brink of a gold rush. The technical resource potential of this largely unmined market soars over 2,000 gigawatts. That’s more than twice the energy currently being produced by all nationwide electric power plants combined. The current US wind industry is located almost 100% onshore but developers are now overcoming political and environmental hurdles to claim their stakes on the nautical charts of the eastern US. Construction and maintenance of an offshore wind farm is rarely easy and never cheap. With so many limiting factors to keep an eye on, the three-decades-old European market relies on strategic control hubs called marine coordination centers to ensure safety, security and thus efficiency.  These centers are an integral piece of the complex offshore wind industry, but they don’t exist in the US yet. Without marine coordination centers established in the US, a service gap may begin to emerge, leaving the door open to safety and eff

TrakReport, SEA.O.G’s Cargo Tracking Solution, Could Transform Project Shipping

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Imagine being at the helm of a large-scale wind park development project, with thousands of pieces of cargo in transit to a construction site halfway around the world, and not knowing where that cargo is. Does that sound like the status quo? It may not be for much longer. Invisible Cargo As the wind energy industry expands to the US market and beyond, the flow of foreign-made turbine components crossing the Atlantic is sure to increase. Changing traffic and weather conditions, multiple cargo transfers, and lack of accurate tracking technology leaves high-level project decision makers with unanswered questions. When will cargo arrive, and in what condition? With cargo transfers and inspections still being logged with pen and paper, and thousands of wind turbine components being shipped, the paperwork starts to stack up quickly. Checking on the status of cargo in real-time isn’t easy. Although vessels can be tracked across the ocean using GPS, this doesn’t allow for m