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Aleron Ltd establish new Partnership Agreement with SEA.O.G Offshore

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Aleron Ltd establish new Partnership Agreement with SEA.O.G Offshore Release Date: 26 April 2021   Aleron Ltd, specialists in complete ROV & tooling solutions, are pleased to announce their newly established partnership with SEA.O.G Offshore. The USA company, with bases in Houston, Texas and New Bedford, Massachusetts, is a leading provider of Maritime Support Services for the Oil & Gas and renewable industries.   The new partners will collaborate to bring Aleron’s intelligent AUXROV system to SEA.O.G Offshore’s key market network in the US Region, with clients benefiting from fast system access and extensive technical support. With a significant five-year track record, the Aleron AUXROV system delivers power and positioning for underslung tools, including, Rock Grabs, Mass Flow Excavation Tools, Rock Bag Deployment frames and cutting tools. The AUXROV has the capacity to control tools conventional ROV’s are unable to operate, offering users a reliable multipurpose system

Feeder Barges Set to Build the Future of OSW in the USA

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  Feeder Barges Set to Build the Future of OSW in the USA A gap exists between what the U.S. industry is asking for, local content, and what the industry currently offers for Jones Act compliant transport and installation solutions for offshore wind operations. Currently deployed vessel types, utilized in a new context, can bridge this gap and help build the future of offshore wind in the United States. The combination of the United States' environmental regulation, cabotage and local content, and equipment deficiencies in the offshore wind (OSW) market makes the industry ripe for innovation. However, the inevitable surge in demand that is to come for offshore renewable energy in the United States will be unleashed on a Jones Act infrastructure that only supports a fraction of the supply chain growth expected by the industry. While offshore wind in the U.S. presents one of the most significant growth opportunities in history for merchant mariners and the shipbuilding market, there

Bart Kroes Joins SEA.O.G Offshore as Technical Director

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    (Houston, Texas) SEA.O.G Offshore is proud to announce the appointment of Bart Kroes as the company's Technical Director. In this role, Mr. Kroes will lead and support the company's engineering team, organizing and structuring all engineering activities for allocated projects.    "We are thrilled to have Bart as a part of our team," says James Clouse, CEO of SEA.O.G. Offshore. "Not only does he have the technical expertise and experience, but he shares our vision and passion for advancing the renewable energy industry."    Mr. Kroes began his career at Heerema Marine Contractors, a leading marine contractor in the international offshore oil & gas and renewables industry. During his time there, Mr. Kroes worked on various offshore transportation and installation projects, including installing three of the biggest floating oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and running the transportation scope for the biggest ultra-Deepwater subsea project offshor

Mike Arnold Joins SEA.O.G. Offshore as Director

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  (Houston, Texas) SEA.O.G. Offshore announced today that Mike Arnold has been appointed as Director of the company. In this new position, Mr. Arnold will lead corporate development for SEA.O.G., operating out of Boston, Massachusetts.   "I see great opportunity working with the SEA.O.G. Offshore team," says Mr. Arnold. "This company has innovative ideas that ensure a bright future with the emerging offshore wind industry in the United States, and I'm excited to be a part of it."   As an entrepreneur and seasoned professional within the subsea arena, Mr. Arnold's prolific career has spanned 38 years and five continents. His experience and expertise are focused on Subsea Remote Intervention – Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV), Survey, Inspection, and remote intervention tooling.   Originally hailing from the United Kingdom, Mr. Arnold entered the offshore industry in 1982. Over the next nine years, he worked as a ROV Pilot, Supervisor, and Offshore Manag

Keeping up with the Jones Act: How Two Words Could Sink America's Future in Offshore Wind

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  The U.S. House of Rep resentatives has passed the Expanding Access to Sustainable Energy Act of 2019, which enforces Jones Act requirements for all offshore renewable energy production. However, the bill's current language has the potential to create a loophole that would leave the U.S. Jones Act fleet on the sidelines. The Jones Act and its applicability to the offshore wind sector has long been debated by politicians, activists, and industry professionals. The act requires components transported between points in the United States to be moved by U.S. b uilt, owned, flagged and crewed vessels . However, it's relevancy as to how it applies to offshore wind industry operations on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) has been questioned.   The latest amendment passed by the House of Representatives aims to clarify the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA), a law developed in 1953 that governs offshore mineral and energy development. The new amendment would extend the OCSLA

Feeder Barges Set to Build the Future of OSW in the USA

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Feeder Barges Set to Build the Future of OSW in the USA A gap exists between what the U.S. industry is asking for, local content, and what the industry currently offers for Jones Act compliant transport and installation solutions for offshore wind operations. Currently deployed vessel types, utilized in a new context, can bridge this gap and help build the future of offshore wind in the United States. The combination of the United States' environmental regulation, cabotage and local content, and equipment deficiencies in the offshore wind (OSW) market makes the industry ripe for innovation. However, the inevitable surge in demand that is to come for offshore renewable energy in the United States will be unleashed on a Jones Act infrastructure that only supports a fraction of the supply chain growth expected by the industry. While offshore wind in the U.S. presents one of the most significant growth opportunities in history for merchant mariners and the shipbuilding market, there a